You Might Be Sitting On Some Incredibly Valuable Vinyl If You Collect Records

Published on 03/01/2021
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Records were humanity’s first method for capturing and replaying music, long before iTunes and Spotify, CDs, and even cassette tapes. People would buy or rent large black discs known as vinyl records, which they would then play on large devices known as record players. We may be preaching to the choir here, but many people have little respect for the classic methods of playing the world’s most popular albums. However, many people place a high value on vinyl records, and if you have any of the following, you could make lots of money!

Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin (1969)

Led Zeppelin had an amazing year in the music world in 1969. To connect with a younger generation, they began experimenting with doing blues covers and released a collection of blues songs. The term Iconic is probably not as well-known for music, but it is a word that can be used today.

Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin (1969)

Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin (1969)

While some thought it was a vain work, Rolling Stone magazine ripped it to shreds, and the record went on to become an instant hit. Ironically, Rolling Stone reversed their earlier criticism by ranking it 29th on their list of the greatest albums ever made. $1000 is the starting point.

Miles Davis, Kind of Blue (1959)

Miles Davis is regarded as one of the pioneering leaders and pioneers of jazz. He is largely responsible for popularizing the genre, giving it the sound we know today. Kind of Blue happened to be his pièce de résistance during his career. However, he is also an incredibly talented trumpeter.

Miles Davis, Kind Of Blue (1959)

Miles Davis, Kind Of Blue (1959)

Paul Chambers, Cannonball Adderley, Bill Evans, Wynton Kelly, Jimmy Cobb, and John Coltrane were all included on the album called “Kind of Blue.” Even if one doesn’t really like jazz music, one can usually get a short lecture from jazz fans. It’s either that or $1000!

The Who, The Who Sell Out (1967)

The Who Sell Out is a scarce album and one of the most difficult to track down in all of mainstream music. The Who decided that only 1,000 copies of this were necessary for some reason. Given its rarity, you can bet that collectors eager to get their hands on rare treats like this one will pay a premium for it.

The Who, The Who Sell Out (1967)

The Who, The Who Sell Out (1967)

Despite the trippy butterfly that came with this record, The Who Sell Out will thankfully stand out from the crowd. Even if you decide to sell some of the stuff on eBay, eBay can still help you out a bit if some items that you sold go for $1,100!

Nirvana, Bleach (1989)

Almost all Nirvana fans agree that Nevermind contains most of the grunge band’s popular songs, but Bleach is the record they will pay the most money for. Nevermind, like The Who’s previous album, it had a 1,000-copy limit and sold for $2,500 each.

Nirvana, Bleach (1989)

Nirvana, Bleach (1989)

As the album title suggests, the first batch of these records was printed in white. There were only 500 copies of these records’ third round, which came in a white 12” and a blue 7”. Each one is now worth about $1,100.

XTC – Science Friction (1977)

As XTC gained popularity during the 1970s, you may remember its name as one of the forerunners in the new wave subgenre emerging from the UK music scene peaked in the mid-1970s. The vinyl was initially pressed as a 12” record before being shortened into a 7” version.

XTC – Science Friction (1977)

XTC – Science Friction (1977)

However, the smaller version is the real meal ticket, easily fetching about $2000. It is sporadic to own this copy collectively, which is basically unheard of, as it is only made up of a handful of albums.

David Bowie – The Prettiest Start (1973)

The man who doesn’t need an introduction, and the album with the instantly recognizable cover. David Bowie had many big hits, but The Prettiest Star is widely considered his best. Of course, the song was written for Bowie’s ex-wife Angela Barnett, whom he adored.

David Bowie – The Prettiest Start (1973)

David Bowie – The Prettiest Start (1973)

Bowie called Barnett and performed the song for her in an adorably romantic gesture. Even though Marc Bolan played guitar on this album, the two would soon become bitter rivals. This record could be sold for $2,000 if someone wanted it.

ABBA – Hova’s Vittne (1981)

ABBA had a major impact on the pop and dance music world of the last few decades. One of their lesser-known tracks, “Hova’s Vittne” (which means “Hova’s Witness” in English), is pressed into the A-side of this record, and the Tivedshambo featured on the flipside.

ABBA – Hova’s Vittne (1981)

ABBA – Hova’s Vittne (1981)

Stig Anderson, the leading band’s man, received Hova’s Vittne as a gift for his 50th birthday. Given that this was a one-of-a-kind gift rather than a commercial release, only a few copies were left, so $3,500 is a reasonable asking price.

The Quarrymen – That’ll Be the Day (1981)

Those familiar with The Quarrymen’s relationship with The Beatles will understand why this record is so special. One of the biggest hits they had was the song taken from Buddy Holly’s music, “that’ll be the day.”

The Quarrymen – That’ll Be The Day (1981)

The Quarrymen – That’ll Be The Day (1981)

The Beatles enjoyed the song so much that they decided to bring it back into circulation, with Paul McCartney reforging it just 50 times on vinyl. So it is no surprise that a record of this magnitude could be worth $3,500.

Cherry Five – Cherry Five (1975)

The word “Cherry Five” might ring a bell to you, but you may be just as familiar with the band name Cherry Five. Regardless, they have at least three songs named “The Dawn of the Dead,” “Deep Red,” and “Suspiria,” that you may have known.

Cherry Five – Cherry Five (1975)

Cherry Five – Cherry Five (1975)

This was undoubtedly a lucrative working relationship with the masters of Hollywood horror, but their most cherished work must have been their first. Of course, this record is tough to come by, and the self-titled album by Cherry Five could easily fetch $3,500.

David Bowie, Diamond Dogs (1974)

Now we will return to David Bowie’s career, whose debut album has one of the most disturbing covers ever. Bowie was known for his surreal persona, and he gave the thumbs-up to whoever painted the Diamond Dogs cover in 1974.

David Bowie, Diamond Dogs (1974)

David Bowie, Diamond Dogs (1974)

The Diamond Dogs’ genitalia was hilariously printed on the sleeve’s back, and record label executives were horrified to learn that it had made it into the public domain. The diamonds on these dogs will cost you at least $3,550.

The Beatles – Abbey Road (1969)

Like many other priceless works of art and music, Abbey Road was not well received when it first came out, and it took many years for it to be recognized as a kingly record. However, if this is indeed an exported UK version, the record we’re talking about is scarce.

The Beatles – Abbey Road (1969)

The Beatles – Abbey Road (1969)

If the logo on the top-left corner of your CD is a Parlophone Records logo, the catalog number is 7088, and the sticker on the back of the sleeve has a gold sticker on it, my friend is in great luck. The legitimately generated copy will earn you around $4000.

Elvis Presley, That’s All Right (1954)

That’s All Right is actually a slowed-down version of a song produced during a lull in Elvis Presley’s band and a producer’s work. The legendary musician began playing his own version of the song as a show of respect to the record producer, Sam Phillips, who had been so impressed.

Elvis Presley, That’s All Right (1954)

Elvis Presley, That’s All Right (1954)

Elvis Presley’s efforts were recorded by the record producer, who added Blue Moon of Kentucky to the B-side. According to some rock ‘n’ roll historians, this was the start of the genre. If you have a piece of recorded history in perfect condition, it is worth around $4,000.

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators – Reverberation (Doubt) (1966)

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators were one of the most inspiring bands to emerge during the 1960s. Furthermore, this group was a forerunner of the psychedelic rock movement. Aside from the fact that many tall buildings in the United States lack a designated 13th floor, the letter “M” (for marijuana) is the thirteenth letter of the alphabet.

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators – Reverberation (Doubt) (1966)

The Thirteenth Floor Elevators – Reverberation (Doubt) (1966)

After a brief collaboration, the ‘Elevators would, of course, disband. Rather than having a large ego, the lead guitarist had paranoid schizophrenia. Their record, Reverberation (Doubt), is a $4000 decent deal with this kind of juicy information.

The Beatles, Please Please Me (1963)

The Beatles’ place at the top of modern music’s Hall of Fame was earned through a combination of hard work and exceptional talent, resulting in consistently excellent records. Please, Please, I was created after a day-long slog that resulted in the completion of seven fantastic songs in just under ten hours!

The Beatles, Please Please Me (1963)

The Beatles, Please Please Me (1963)

In Colin Larkin’s third edition of the All-Time Top 1000 Albums, it was voted number 622. (2000). If you have a mono copy of this record, you can ask for $4,200. The stereo version, on the other hand, will command a much higher price.

Depeche Mode, Music for the Masses

The Depeche Mode record’s cover photo is the most lucrative feature in the entire record, showing a picture of crimson speakerphones set against a romantic dawn sky.  Once the orange frame passes, then the ultimate goal is reached for this graphic.

Depeche Mode, Music For The Masses

Depeche Mode, Music For The Masses

The band’s label accidentally distributed this version of the record for a short time before quickly discontinuing it. This minor blunder could net you a tidy sum of $4,600! It’s incredible how two different versions of the same thing can have such diverse values.

Misfits, Legacy of Brutality (1985)

Given that only 16 copies of Brutality’s Legacy were released, this is a more difficult record to find than most. When Glen Danzig, the Misfits’ ex-vocalist, learned that this record’s production had been released without his permission, he immediately contacted his lawyer and began a months-long legal battle.

Misfits, Legacy Of Brutality (1985)

Misfits, Legacy Of Brutality (1985)

This was one of the first compilations to make many of the Static Age’s songs available to the general public. Glenn Danzig mixed and produced the album and created new versions of the featured songs by overdubbing many tracks from the original song recordings with his own instrumental tracks. If you happen to own one of the many hidden gems on the market, you could easily sell it for $5000.

Elvis Presley – Speedway (1968)

If you’re a fan of Elvis Presley, you’ve probably seen some of his films, which were a real hit-or-miss cinematic experience. While the film Speedway was critically panned, the music was, without a doubt, incredible. Even though Elvis was regarded as a surprisingly talented actor, his efforts could not save the film from disappointing.

Elvis Presley – Speedway (1968)

Elvis Presley – Speedway (1968)

Even though the film was finished in the early summer of 1967, it was not released in theaters until June of the following year. It was a box office hit, debuting at #40 on Variety’s national box office list for the year. According to rumors, only 300 copies of this record were made, making each one worth a staggering amount of money – $5,000 per vinyl!

Brute Force – King of Fuh (1969)

With a name like King of Fu and a single like “King of Fu,” you can bet they enjoyed including a lot of cussing and filth in their lyrics, to the point where their main supporters were disturbed beyond support.

Brute Force – King Of Fuh (1969)

Brute Force – King Of Fuh (1969)

After considering the many different musical inflections the song possessed, the song was eventually pieced together in the most commercially viable way, one that would only be released in 2010. For $5,000, you can own this delayed wonder.

Elton John – I’ve Been Loving You (1968)

Bernie Taupin was, at least for a time, the man behind many of Elton John’s hit songs, including I’ve Been Loving You. He was one of Elton’s biggest supporters, and the two revealed that Elton wrote the song himself long after the pop star’s debut single had become a hit.

Elton John – I’ve Been Loving You (1968)

Elton John – I’ve Been Loving You (1968)

This recording, which was made on tour for his 1990 release, is a first in Portugal. If you are lucky enough to run into a collector who knows what they are doing, they would happily give you $5,000 for your copy.

Bruce Springsteen – Spirit in the Night (1973)

This Springsteen single is hard to find and hard to listen to. Spirit in the Night may have a high demand as a collectible since many went for hundreds of dollars each. Needless to say, copies today cost around $5000.

Bruce Springsteen – Sprit In The Night (1973)

Bruce Springsteen – Spirit In The Night (1973)

So, if you remember seeing the CSI Nick shirt, you had the best start hunting for it in your collection!. Until he released his third album, Born to Ride, Bruce Springsteen still received a lot of attention from the crowds, but he still likes this one a lot, and it becomes a hit song.

21st Century Symphony Orchestra – Waltzes by Johann Strauss, Jr.

We’re taking a break from the rockers to appreciate the classically minded virtuosos, but their violins and clarinets didn’t make this 21st Century Symphony Orchestra release particularly memorable, unfortunately. Andy Warhol, a previously unknown artist, was hired to create the cover art for this Johann Strauss, Jr. recording, which makes this insanely rare record a big deal.

21st Century Symphony Orchestra – Waltzes By Johann Strauss, Jr.

21st Century Symphony Orchestra – Waltzes By Johann Strauss, Jr.

Only 7 copies of this vinyl have survived, with one in the Andy Warhol Museum and another selling for $5,500 in 2012. On eBay, this record has only been sold at auction four times. Please let me know if you know of any other copies.

Max Steiner – The Caine Mutiny

This album was made with many copies of author Herman Wouk’s novel of the same name being read aloud into microphones. When said writer realized that he had imitated a great deal from the writer’s work, he became angry.

Max Steiner – The Caine Mutiny

Max Steiner – The Caine Mutiny

He informed the studio that if they released this record into circulation, they would not be allowed to use his writing again. Columbia’s staff then went about razing their content, but a few sneaky members ultimately secretly stashed a few copies, one of which fetched $6,700 in 2007.

The Sex Pistols – God Save the Queen (1977)

The Sex Pistols’ already shaky relationship with their former label, A&M, quickly devolved into complete anarchy when the punk rockers decided they despised one another. In true Sex Pistols fashion, the boys set out to make the lives of the A&M executives as difficult as possible.

The Sex Pistols – God Save The Queen (1977)

The Sex Pistols – God Save The Queen (1977)

The band’s label threatened that the band’s most famous and well-received album, God Save the Queen, should be erased from existence. Contrary to popular belief, a few copies of the first edition survived somehow, and today, they go for over $8,600!

U2 – Pride (In The Name Of Love) (1984)

U2’s single, In The Name Of Love, is said to have sold only 50 copies. It was even dubbed the “388th greatest song ever made” by Rolling Stone. Bono, astonishingly, refuses to accept such praise, claiming that he was dissatisfied with the final product.

U2 – Pride (In The Name Of Love) (1984)

U2 – Pride (In The Name Of Love) (1984)

This song is compelling because it reflects Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination and the civil rights movement. Even if Bono is a little upset about this track, the collectors aren’t quite as happy to pay $9,000 for a copy.

Olivia Newton-John and Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), Xanadu (1980)

Although critically acclaimed, “Xanadu” is one of the most critically panned films ever made. Olivia Newton-John’s album, which she produced with Electric Light Orchestra and other musicians, was also ruined when Olivia decided she didn’t like her appearance on the cover.

Olivia Newton John And Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), Xanadu (1980)

Olivia Newton-John And Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), Xanadu (1980)

It was almost a foregone conclusion that production would be halted and that only 30 copies would escape the star’s notice. After all, a single one of these record covers with Olivia on it that survived the purge is now worth $9,100!

Hank Mobley – Blue Notes 1568 (1957)

Despite being less well-known than more charismatic peers such as John Coltrane and Miles Davis, jazz fans regard Hank Mobley as a legend. According to legend, the record company in charge of the Blue Note record’s printing ran out of labels!

Hank Mobley – Blue Notes 1568 (1957)

Hank Mobley – Blue Notes 1568 (1957)

Even if you have the version with the address “47 West 63rd New York 23” or “47 West 63rd NYC” does not really matter, but it is best to check the address if the future value with the greatest promise of satisfying your needs, though $11,162 is the maximum worth when choosing between each of those addresses, whichever it may be.

Robert Johnson – Me and the Devil Blues (1938)

Robert Johnson, the godfather of the blues, has recorded the quintessential blues record. If you want to play the blues, you’re supposed to sell your soul to the devil, and “Me and the Devil Blues” is a song about that.

Robert Johnson – Me And The Devil Blues (1938)

Robert Johnson – Me And The Devil Blues (1938)

Many people believe that Johnson was not poetic when he sang about this diabolical transaction. Let’s hope that whoever buys this becomes fully functional and does not cause the person who does not know how to use it to start suffering from paranormal activities.

The White Stripes – Lafayette Blues (1998)

Going back to a time closer to the 21st century, and Dave Buick busies himself painting and the 15 special versions of The White Stripes’ Lafayette Blues single, even exists still today. We believe that Buick also founded the Italy Records label.

The White Stripes – Lafayette Blues (1998)

The White Stripes – Lafayette Blues (1998)

This picture was released to support the new album release of The White Stripes and to celebrate the concert with a record release. Those lucky enough to buy one of these records did so for only $6 and can now ask for $12,700 for one!

Stonewall – Stonewall

Are you a psychedelic rock fan? If so, then you must have heard of the Stonewall Riots. This band didn’t accept record companies at all, and they even refused to listen to record label executives who came to them with the idea of recording their album.

Stonewall – Stonewall

Stonewall – Stonewall

Due to how musicians distribute their music, getting a hold of their music can be an arduous task. This band got upset when one of their albums was never released, which the band did not agree to. The recipient of this rock record is willing to exchange it for a minimum of $14,000.

Royksopp – Melody A.M.

Finally, we have one of the few albums on this list that had flawless production and received massive sales upon release. Everyone who worked on it got along, and Norwegian electro duo Royksopp released Melody A.M. in 2001 to over one million copies sold.

Royksopp – Melody A.M.

Royksopp – Melody A.M.

Surprisingly, The Beatles had intended to use an album cover that depicted them in a gruesome butchery scene. They’d be dressed as butchers, seated around a table with little girls’ dolls and meat strewn across their bodies. Of course, this image did not go over well with many people.

The Beatles – Yesterday and Today (1966)

Surprisingly, The Beatles had intended to use an album cover that depicted them in a gruesome butchery scene. They’d be dressed as butchers, seated around a table with little girls’ dolls and meat strewn across their bodies. Of course, this image did not go over well with many people.

The Beatles – Yesterday And Today (1966)

The Beatles – Yesterday And Today (1966)

Capitol Records had to pay $250,000 to recover nearly one million records from stores. Undoubtedly, many escaped the witch hunt, and if you happen to have one, you could sell it for $15,000 if you have a copy.

The Rolling Stones – Street Fighting Man (1968)

The Rolling Stones, like The Beatles, were known for their scandalous covers, and Street Fighting Man was no exception. The first cover depicted a police officer examining a wounded protestor. The Democratic National Convention was besieged by rioters just days before publication in 1968, prompting executives to think twice about adding fuel to the media fires.

The Rolling Stones – Street Fighting Man (1968)

The Rolling Stones – Street Fighting Man (1968)

The song was ranked 301 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The records were quickly discarded, with only about 18 making it through the purge. One of these survivors was auctioned off for $17,000 in 2011.

The Five Sharps – Stormy Weather (1952)

With The Five Sharps’ 1952 release 1952, we present you with the rarest record on our list thus far. The public so poorly received stormy Weather at the time of its release that The Five Sharps were forced to start repurchasing them!

The Five Sharps – Stormy Weather (1952)

The Five Sharps – Stormy Weather (1952)

It seems this amusingly tragic release would become so well-known that it would become a highly sought-after collectible in modern times. The band members appeared to have purchased all but three copies, which are expected to sell for $20,000 each today.

The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

Eat your hearts out, punk rockers! Although the Velvet Underground is considered a pioneering band in protest music, they played many mild by current standards, causing them to be reviled for the first few years of their career.

The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

Despite the best efforts of bureaucrats to wipe this record from the face of the Earth, the band still managed to sell 30,000 copies. When a Canadian collector spotted a copy in a flea market stall, he bought it for less than a dollar from the oblivious peddler. The Velvet Underground and Nico were then sold for $25,200!

Frank Wilson – Do I Love You (Indeed I Do)

Two of Frank Wilson’s biggest hits are on this album: “Sweeter As The Days Go By” and “Do I Love You.” But he and Berry Gordy, the godfather of Motown, decided it was best to keep Frank on the radar.

Frank Wilson – Do I Love You (Indeed I Do)

Frank Wilson – Do I Love You (Indeed I Do)

Berry then went about destroying all of the Do I Love You releases, with only a few escaping his grasp. One copy was safely stored in a Motown vault, while the other sold for around $34,000 in a 2009 auction.

Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

Before it was released, this Bob Dylan album underwent some revisions, with a few of the tracks being replaced. A few of the records were accidentally released before they could be edited, making them extremely valuable to record collectors.

Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan (1963)

If you find a copy that says -1A and includes the tracks, then you are seriously in the money: “Gamblin’ Willie’s Dead Man’s Hand,” “Talkin’ John Birch Blues,” “Rocks and Gravel,” and “Let Me Die In My Footsteps.” The asking price is $35,000.

Tommy Johnson – Alcohol and Jake Blues (1930)

Alcohol and Jake Blues, by Tommy Johnson, was released in 1930 and is another scarce record from another era. Someone in North Carolina accidentally picked up one of the few copies that had survived for nearly a century.

Tommy Johnson – Alcohol And Jake Blues (1930)

Tommy Johnson – Alcohol And Jake Blues (1930)

Given that this was one of the two remaining versions, the last thing they expected was a flood of enthusiastic responses on eBay. The $37,000 bid by a man named John Tefteller brought the digital auction to a close.

Prince – The Black Album

Prince was a deeply spiritual man, and each of his albums was purposefully recorded with positive energy. However, when the late superstar decided that ‘The Funk Bible’ had an evil spirit, he ordered its sale to be halted immediately. People were still pirating music back then, so the contents of this record were safely preserved.

Prince – The Black Album

Prince – The Black Album

Prince decided in 1994 that the album was safe for human consumption, and a CD version was released. From previous sales, the sealed version of this record sells for around $42,300, while the opened version sells for around $27,500.

Aphex Twin AKA Caustic Window – Caustic Window

To refer to this album, Aphex Twin uses an alternative name to refer it, which is sometimes called Caustic Window. The eccentric genius decided that the novelty was not worth continuing after only five versions were released.

Aphex Twin AKA Caustic Window – Caustic Window

Aphex Twin AKA Caustic Window – Caustic Window

Fans of the producer were ecstatic to see the long-lost album surface on Discogs in 2017, with opening bids starting at $13,500. Markus Persson, the creator of Minecraft, won the auction with a bid of $46,300! We’re curious if any of its tracks appear on the soundtrack to his block-building masterpiece…

The Beatles – The Beatles (The White Album) (1968)

It should be of no surprise that there are so many valuable Beatles records that are rare. With this one being their 9th record, one copy features a unique serial number: A0000001. Some believed John Lennon had the original album.

The Beatles – The Beatles (The White Album) (1968)

The Beatles – The Beatles (The White Album) (1968)

But it later turned out that Ringo Starr was the lucky owner. It was then kept in a bank vault for 35 years. This eventually was sold at auction for $790,100, a jaw-dropping amount of money, as every cent went straight to charity.

Steel City Connection – Dansation/Steel City Disco (1978)

You could easily ask for a copy of the Steel City Disco today for close to $900. Given that it sold only a few dollars during its release in 1978, this is a pretty good profit. This album was the most profitable release of Steel City Connection.

Steel City Connection – Dansation/Steel City Disco (1978)

Steel City Connection – Dansation/Steel City Disco (1978)

A few songs off the album would go on to become very popular with the public. Its popularity then makes the rarer presence of this record amazingly profitable. This is a straightforward situation, no controversy, just good, old-fashioned goodness.

Thrillers/Delta Cats, Last Dance/Unworthy Baby (1968)

I understand the next act on the list is a 1968 collaboration between the Thrillers’ Last Dance and the Delta Cars’ Unworthy Baby. Both bands began gaining a worldwide following shortly after forming in England, eventually making this a highly desired release.

Thriller/Delta Cats, Last Dance/Unworthy Baby (1968)

Thriller/Delta Cats, Last Dance/Unworthy Baby (1968)

People are willing to pay $1,000 to get their hands on a copy of  “Thrillers/Delta Cats” or a copy of “Last Dance/Unworthy Baby.” If you are a fan of the band, it might be worth paying this much.

Terea – Terea (1977)

The fact that Terea’s eponymous album was a large release, on par with the time average, may have seemed like a completely synced to us back then. These days, however, Terea’s critically acclaimed album idea is quite highly contested.

Terea – Terea (1977)

Terea – Terea (1977)

Terea’s second album would be their final, and their farewell album is highly sought after by hardcore fans. They’d be willing to pay $1,700 for a copy. Terea is still a popular band today, so this album is in high demand.

Nirvana, Love Buzz/Big Cheese (1988)

Nirvana is a well-known rock band from the United States. While the majority of their music is widely available, there are a few records that are extremely hard to find, one of which is 1988’s Love Buzz/Big Cheese.

Nirvana, Love Buzz/Big Cheese (1988)

Nirvana, Love Buzz/Big Cheese (1988)

While the band’s mainstream fans are more familiar with their more well-known releases, this is one that only the most devoted fans are aware of, with only a few owning a copy. Superfans who own one of the few copies paid more than $3,000 for it.

World’s Experience Orchestra, The Beginning Of A New Birth (1975)

Musicians used to record long tracks for their albums back in the day, and World’s Experience Orchestra’s 1975 release, The Beginning Of A New Birth, was no exception. The album contains two soul-jazz gems, the first of which is 14 minutes long and the second of which is 22 minutes long.

World’s Experience Orchestra, The Beginning Of A New Birth (1975)

World’s Experience Orchestra, The Beginning Of A New Birth (1975)

It is universally agreed that this to be the greatest work by the band, and the potential buyer should brush up on the band’s history. All in all, this is a fair trade for something so iconic.

Tudor Lodge – Tudor Lodge (1971)

If you love English folk music, then Tudor Lodge is an essential addition to your collection, as it is one of the lesser-known artists of our times. Tudor Lodge is an English folk music ensemble formed in 1968, featuring two big brains, John Stannard and Roger Strevens.

Tudor Lodge – Tudor Lodge (1971)

Tudor Lodge – Tudor Lodge (1971)

In today’s market, their self-titled 1971 release is difficult to come by, and if you want to complete your Tudor Lodge discography, you’ll need to set aside around $3,540. Of course, only the most ardent fans of the folk band would be willing to pay that much for music, so think twice!

The Smiths – Hand In Glove/Handsome Devil (1984)

The Smiths are one of the most well-known pop groups in England, but their true genre is referred to as “jangle.” Hand In Glove/Handsome Devil was technically recorded at Strawberry Studios in Stockport in 1983. It reached No. 3 on the UK Indie Chart, but failed to crack the top 75 on the UK Singles Chart, landing at No. 124.

The Smiths – Hand In Glove/Handsome Devil (1984)

The Smiths – Hand In Glove/Handsome Devil (1984)

It then sat in limbo for almost a year before being released in 1984. The Smiths are a fantastic cult band, and given how uncommon this release is, fans (or serious collectors) will gladly pay $3,500 or more to get it off your hands.

Pink Floyd – The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn (1967)

While almost everyone alive today who has ever enjoyed music has heard of Pink Floyd, it is a tragedy that younger generations do not value this iconic band as much as they should. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was released in special limited editions to commemorate its thirtieth, fortieth, and fiftieth anniversaries, the latter two of which included bonus tracks.

Pink Floyd – The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn (1967)

Pink Floyd – The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn (1967)

The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn was released in 1967 following a three-month recording session by the band. The tracks were then quickly mastered and produced by the producers at EMI’s London studio. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was ranked 347 on Rolling Stone magazine’s “500 Greatest Albums of All Time” list in 2012 and will be ranked 253 in the 2020 edition.

Nicholas Greenwood – Cold Cuts (1972)

In 1969, Nicholas Greenwood left his original band, the Crazy World of Arthur Brown, to pursue a solo career. Cold Cuts, his most successful work, would prove to be far more successful than the work he produced with his former bandmates.

Nicholas Greenwood – Cold Cuts (1972)

Nicholas Greenwood – Cold Cuts (1972)

The term “unpredictable” was used to describe this experimental work. With ten flawless songs that have all received critical acclaim, Cold Cuts rocked the music industry. Its vinyl copy is in high demand because it’s such a great album, fetching more than $3,500 now.

Charlie Parker – Bird Blows The Blues (1949)

“Bird Blows The Blues” is divided into two tracks, one with six songs and the other with seven, each of which is a complete delight. This is a funky jazz album that’s a great way to get started with the genre.

Charlie Parker – Bird Blows The Blues (1949)

Charlie Parker – Bird Blows The Blues (1949)

If you’ve never heard of moody music before but want to broaden your musical horizons, this is the album for you. Purchasing this particular Charlie Parker vinyl, after all, would be quite expensive, costing around $3,540.

U2 – Three (1979)

We’re back with U2 with an album from August 1978, recorded at their famous Dublin studio, Windmill Lane Studios. It was released the following month with less than fifteen minutes of pure gold, making September of that year a real treat for the band’s fans worldwide.

U2 – Three (1979)

U2 – Three (1979)

With the iTunes free app, many people were agitated to learn that Apple required them to make U2 tracks a part of their iTunes library even if they never used the app. If those people had bought the vinyl, however, they would be thrilled to receive it.

Sun Ra – Supersonic Jazzy (1956)

Sun Ra is an experimental wonder who was years ahead of his time with albums like Supersonic Jazz, which he recorded at RCA Studios in Chicago in 1956. When Impulse! Reissued the album in 1974, it was renamed Super-Sonic Sounds, but when Evidence Records released it on CD in 1992, it reverted to its original title.

Sun Ra – Supersonic Jazzy (1956)

Sun Ra – Supersonic Jazzy (1956)

Sun Ra’s personal label, Saturn Records, which he co-managed with Alton Abraham, funded this baker’s dozen sumptuous, moody, and experimental tracks. Sun Ra only released three albums in the 1950s, including this one on July 12, 1956. With this record, you can have your spot in the sun today for $4,425!

Madonna – Erotica (1992)

Madonna has gone through many different musical movements and changes for her career as a musician in the music industry. Thus she may be memorable among the world for her historical significance, given that she is still performing music to this day while being a historical figure.

Madonna – Erotica (1992)

Madonna – Erotica (1992)

Even though it isn’t a “common” experience, taking part in “erotica” might cost you around $4,425 today. Being a rare talent that other adoring pop musicians (bootlegs and such) do not have, Madonna fetches a large amount of money when she sells (copies of) her albums.

Michael Garrick Trio – Moonscape (1964)

In 1964, Airborne recorded a half-dozen tracks for the Michael Garrick Trio that would eventually become Moonscape, the group’s most defining album. Given how important Moonscape is to the group, expect superfans to fight for copies of the album on vinyl.

Michael Garrick Trio – Moonscape (1964)

Michael Garrick Trio – Moonscape (1964)

Few people have ever heard this stunning lunar jazz until now, and for 99 obvious reasons. The right to call yourself a Michael Garrick Trio ultimate supporter will set you back $5,310. This is the cost of such loyalty or a significant investment.

Genesis – The Silent Sun/That’s Me! (1980)

You didn’t think we’d forget about Genesis, did you? This is an 11-track record with five tracks on Track A and six tracks on Track B. These songs are all considered by the fans and the critics alike to be Genesis’ greatest hits.

Genesis – The Silent Sun/That’s Me! (1980)

Genesis – The Silent Sun/That’s Me! (1980)

The band put together a mix of genres into an album that they continued to experiment with, such as progressive, psychedelic, and art-rock. Show your appreciation for Phil Collins and the boys’ hard work of the band with a $5,300 tribute to honor the band.

John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Double Fantasy

This record, out of all the ones on this list, maybe the most unique, thanks to a significant contribution from John Lennon. The album stalled on the charts upon its release and received mostly negative reviews from critics, with many focusing on the album’s idealization of Lennon and Ono’s marriage.

John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Double Fantasy

John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Double Fantasy

Double Fantasy was one of the few albums Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono, were able to complete before John Lennon was tragically murdered. He signed one copy only hours before the horrific event. A lucky bidder purchased the copy in question for $150,000 in 1999.

The Beatles: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

If you thought one Beatles member’s signature was valuable, you could bet that adding the rest of their names to a record’s cover will greatly increase its value. The people who put this relic up for auction in 2013 would have been content with a $30 000 profit.

The Beatles: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

The Beatles: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

Once bidding began at $290,000, the people’s expectations were much greater than they had imagined. Even without the inclusion of critical signatures, this special edition of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band is still lovely due to its musical lyrics.

Elvis Presley – My Happiness

“My Happiness” is a pop music classic that first gained popularity in the mid-twentieth century. Barney Bergantine wrote an unpublished version of the melody with different lyrics in 1933. Jack White may have a record on this precious list, but he also appreciates vintage vinyl, particularly if it is precious.

Elvis Presley – My Happiness

Elvis Presley – My Happiness

My Happiness marked the start of the King’s long musical career, and given that it was his first album, you can bet it’s worth more than most people will ever earn in their lives. In a December 2015 auction, White paid $300,000 for this record.

Wu-Tang Clan – Once Upon a Time in Shaolin

We’ve finally arrived at the world’s most valuable record, which, believe it or not, belongs to the legendary Wu-Tang Clan, a hip-hop group. This metal record could be purchased by anyone as long as it wasn’t resold for another century!

Wu Tang Clan – Once Upon A Time In Shaolin

Wu-Tang Clan – Once Upon A Time In Shaolin

It became a hotly contested cultural artifact due to this novel requirement, with bids reaching two million dollars! When the record’s owner was arrested for serious securities fraud, the FBI confiscated it in an odd turn of events.

Long Cleve Reed & Little Harvey Hill, Original Stack O’Lee Blues 78 Rpm In Plain Sleeve

Joe Bussard, a well-known record collector, decided that this Long Cleve Reed & Little Harvey Hill record was worth $70,000. You can bet that if there is only one copy of a well-known record, its value will be huge.

Long Cleve Reed & Little Harvey Hill, Original Stack O’Lee Blues 78 Rpm In Plain Sleeve

Long Cleve Reed & Little Harvey Hill, Original Stack O’Lee Blues 78 Rpm In Plain Sleeve

Its value from an auditory standpoint is also boosted due to it being produced in the 78 RPM format, which was among the first records to be captured using electronic recording technology. The final price turned out to be $50,000.

Jean-Michel Jarre – Music for Supermarkets

In 1983, a group of Parisian artists collaborated to create an exhibition with the theme of supermarkets. The experimental electronic composer Jean-Michel Jarre was invited to join the project, and he produced a single album called “Music for Supermarkets.”

Jean Michel Jarre – Music For Supermarkets

Jean Michel Jarre – Music For Supermarkets

This was his work of art, which he purchased for $14,000 at the exhibition, which increased to $33,500 due to inflation. Jarre destroyed the master plates, so this is without a doubt the only copy.

Ferris Wheel – Supernatural Girl

While you may not be familiar with the terms “stoner-folk” or “Ferris Wheel,” they are clearly a big deal if their single record is worth $15,000. If the sleeve is the original, has the ‘blakeyburch’ copyright seal, and is jet black in color.

Ferris Wheel – Supernatural Girl

Ferris Wheel – Supernatural Girl

In that scenario, you would make yourself $15,000, too, which would be pretty good. The pocket opens on the top of the sleeve is one of its issues, as the pocket opens to the wrong side.

Darrell Banks – Open The Door To Your Heart/Our Love (Is In The Pocket)

Darrel Banks had a brief but fruitful career before passing away tragically young at the age of 32. In his brief career as a producer, he had one major hit, Open the Door to Your Heart, recorded alongside Our Love (Is in The Pocket).

Darrell Banks – Open The Door To Your Heart Or Our Love (Is In The Pocket)

Darrell Banks – Open The Door To Your Heart Or Our Love (Is In The Pocket)

It was an auction that had a unique item as an item up for auction. In other words, there were no other auctions of this item currently being sold. The asset that was eventually seized was worth $26,550.

Dark – Dark Round The Edges

With 64 copies released into circulation, this is a record produced at a higher rate than the majority of the others on this list. Dark and his friends decided to give the majority of the copies to their loved ones.

Dark – Dark Round The Edges

Dark – Dark Round The Edges

Let’s hope that the people who still had these lucky copies felt a sense of pride and accomplishment. Today, that lucky recipient could stand to earn around $17,700 for theirs. Sometimes, it can actually be beneficial to have musicians as professional peer contacts.

Junior McCants – Try Me For Your New Love / She Wrote It I Read It

Like many of the artists on this list, Junior McCants died tragically young at 24. When he died of cancer in 1967, just weeks before the release of Try Me For Your New Love / She Wrote It I Read It, his life’s work became immediately prized and protected.

Junior McCants – Try Me For Your New Love Or She Wrote It I Read It

Junior McCants – Try Me For Your New Love, Or She Wrote It I Read It

About a hundred years ago, the circulation of The Lancet called it quits. Record experts report that those in possession of the few copies remaining in public hands will sell for anywhere between $7,500 and $15,000.

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