40+ Countries That Are Deemed The Wealthiest

Published on 12/21/2020
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In several aspects, wealth is quantified. Some see it solely as the cash you have, whereas others take a gander at your life quality or personal wealth. When assessing the riches of countries, the very same goes. A few other nations may conquer the world in the gross national product, such as Indonesia as well as China, but more often than not, they have low salaries as well as extreme poverty. We combined three wealth statistics with seeing whether the nations providing the highest correct value of the gross domestic product (GDP), average salary, as well as the Social Progress Index to help dig through plenty of figures and discover the richest countries around the world.

40+ Countries That Are Deemed The Wealthiest

40+ Countries That Are Deemed The Wealthiest

Costa Rica

The small Central American nation of Costa Rica is indeed the beginning of our ranking of the 50 richest countries. Yes, of course, its GDP of $60.1 billion is really just No. 79, or its average salary of $9,645 is No. 98, however with the support of a No. 33 rankings in SPI, it drags its way down to the bottom of our top-50 list. The SPI of Costa Rica is boosted by high water and sanitation ranking list, access to nourishment as well as basic healthcare, and individual freedoms. In its SPI, there are some imperfections that bring it down to No. 33, including a 36.36 score in access to high-quality education, 65.66 in personal safety as well as a 65.89 inclusiveness score.

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Croatia

Croatia is not really a country in the world that most will glance at when having thought regarding riches, and because of its $60.8 billion GDP ranking No. 78 worldwide and its $10,314 average salary ranking No. 94, we can’t really blame them. Its No. 37 SPI standings is just where Croatia tends to make up a lot of ground, which did help it to arrive on our ranking of richest nations at No. 49. This SPI ranking is boosted by high safe water and sanitation ratings, access to basic healthcare, as well as access to decent knowledge. Croatia is struggling, like many European nations, in terms of inclusiveness (47.84 points) as well as the availability of advanced education (49.31), which reduces its total score by a decent bit.

Croatia

Croatia

Latvia

The $34.8 billion GDP of this European nation is lackluster. However, its No. 39 standings in the SPI tries to pull it back into balance. The SPI ratings are boosted by high ratings for access to nourishment and adequate healthcare, clean water, and sanitation, as well as individual rights. But that was weighed down by a score of 44.34 in access to the best education as well as 51.14 in inclusiveness.

Latvia

Latvia

Algeria

The only African nation on our ranking is Algeria, listed No. 47. Algeria does not have any outstanding figures, but its No. 56 ranked 180.7 billion GDP and No. 58 ranked average earnings of $22,064 strikes stability that puts it in the bottom section of our list of the top 50 richest nations. In SPI at No. 75, Algeria struggles to keep up. Although it does get OK ratings in connectivity to nourishment and medical care and provision of basic knowledge, its 20.24, as well as 42.58 inclusiveness scores in access to the best education, bring it down.

Algeria

Algeria

Turkey

Turkey possesses a unique GDP of 766.5 billion dollars, which makes it 19th in the global economy. In terms of wealth, this type of production could perhaps end up making it far greater, but it also has extreme weaknesses in average income as well as SPI ranking. Turkey currently ranked No. 93 in average revenue, with the average Turkish laborer pulling in about $ 10,380. The SPI of Turkey is not doing any favors at No. 76. Whilst also Turkey ranks high in access to clean water as well as sanitary conditions and access to nourishment and medical care, inclusiveness (24.33 points), access to academic education (42.28 points), basic rights (43.07 points), personal security (54.93 points) and individual choice and freedom (54.93 points) are very crucial subjects for Turkey (63.03 points).

Turkey

Turkey

Slovakia

The landlocked nation of Central Europe, Slovakia, considering the low GDP and median earnings, checks in at No. 45 on our ranking. The No. 35 ranking in SPI earns Slovakia its broad access to clean water as well as sanitation, access to food and medical care, and access to housing. SPI has a score of 39.97 points in terms of access to academic education, but that is the standard practice in Europe. Where Slovakia slides, its No. 63 ranked GDP at $106.5 billion, and No. 90 ranked average revenue at just $10,653.

Slovakia

Slovakia

Romania

When pondering the world’s richest countries, Romania may not have been fresh in people’s minds, but kudos to its $239.6 billion GDP ranked No. 49 and SPI ranked No. 44, it checks in at No. 44 on our ranking. The latter score is largely attributable to the superior access of the county to nourishment and adequate healthcare. Romania’s SPI tends to suffer from access to the best education stat of 38.75 as well as an inclusiveness score of 45.31. What draws Romania deep down the scale of the richest nations is its average income of $11,290.0, ranked No. 89.

Romania

Romania

Malaysia

Southeast Asia is significantly under-represented on this ranking, though with a fairly high $354.3 billion GDP that puts it No. 38 in the globe, Malaysia tends to make it just below the cut at No. 43. Shoving it down on the list, average revenue is what concerns most of this country. On average, jobs pay just $10,460 a year, taking the country at No. 92 in the world. Also, in SPI at No. 50, Malaysia also collapses a tad. Good marks for access to water and sanitation, housing, nutrition, and access to medical care are pumping up Malaysia’s SPI rating. With a total score of 40.98, 45.4, and 58.9, Malaysia is struggling in terms of inclusiveness, availability of advanced education, and personal rights.

Malaysia

Malaysia

Estonia

Estonia is far beyond what some may perceive as one of several richest countries, with a $30.2 billion GDP that currently ranked only No. 104 in the world. Its $26,898 average revenue, ranked No. 47, does not help much either. It is its No. 27 ranking in SPI that basically puts this European nation at No. 42 on our ranking. With top marks in access to clean water as well as sanitation, access to nourishment and proper healthcare, as well as personal rights, Estonia is crushing the SPI. Like some other European nations, its 52.81 access points to academic education could benefit from enhancement, and so could its 55.07 inclusiveness points.

Estonia

Estonia

China

China is just another one-hit-wonder on our ranking, just like with its No. 2 ranked 13.6 trillion GDP, it strangles all but the U.S. but fell significantly in earnings as well as SPI. The other circles on our ranking at No. 66, and it really is easy to know where it falls down with all of the media China obtains: a 27.04 score in personal rights, a 31.02 score in inclusiveness, and a 39.45 score in access to the best education. In terms of access to medical care, China sets the standard. In its average revenue, which is currently ranked 102nd in the world, just at $9,470 annually, is China’s most huge flaw.

China

China

Russia

Russia seems to have a massive $1.7 trillion GDP, which brings it No. 11 in the globe, but because of its $10,230 average income ranked No. 95, it falls sharply to No. 40 on our list. SPI is not doing any favors at No. 66 much anyway. Russian SPI numbers are boosted by healthy scores on access to medical care, access to basic knowledge, as well as water and sanitation. However, in terms of inclusiveness, personal security as well as individual rights, results of 33.69, 45.74, and 52.87 are dragging in the reverse direction.

Russia

Russia

Lithuania

The $53.3 billion GDP of this European nation currently ranked only No. 86 in the world, as well as its average income of $26,429 is lesser at No. 50 in the world. However, its No. 31 standings in SPI provides it a raise. In the SPI, connectivity to adequate medical care, access to water and sanitation, and individual rights are highly rated in Lithuania. Like so many Euro countries, access to academic education is low at 49.79 points, but health and wellness, as well as inclusiveness, are also low at 67.84 and 63.54 points.

Lithuania

Lithuania

Saudi Arabia

As the world’s biggest producer of oil, without Saudi Arabia, no compilation of the richest nations would’ve been comprehensive. Nearly half of Saudi Arabia’s $782.4 billion GDP, ranked No. 18, tends to come from oil, as per OPEC. Saudi Arabia ought to be higher than No. 38 with such a high of a GDP ranking. However, its No. 61 ranked average income of $21,540, and the No. 86 SPI ranking nearly pulled it off of the ranking completely. The SPI of Saudi Arabia receives raises from convenient access to water and sanitation and proper healthcare. However, with three extremely poor results, it takes tremendous hits: 13.87 inclusiveness points, 17.26 personal rights points, and 36.82 access points to academic education.

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia

Brazil

As its $9,140 average wage ranks No. 103 in the globe, Brazil goes to show how a nation can surmount one tremendous flaw with a large rating in some other bracket. However, its No. 9-ranked 1.9 trillion GDP pulls it back onto our list. It is its No. 49 ranking in the SPI that balances out everything. In terms of access to medical care and water and sanitation, these standings in SPI owes much to the country’s good marks. However, in terms of access to highly developed education and personal safety, which obtained scores of 36.80 as well as 47.26, respectively, huge hits are needed.

Brazil

Brazil

Cyprus

Cyprus, an island country throughout the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, has been on our list at No. 36, but definitely not thanks to its own GDP of $24.5 billion, which ranks No. 112 worldwide. Where Cyprus performs admirably, its average income of $45,705 is ranked No. 20 and No. 28 in the SPI. The latter is largely attributable to the country’s clean water and sanitary conditions, access to proper medical care as well as personal rights (although it has struggled with water shortages in the old days). If it weren’t for its 53.27 points in access to the best education, this score would’ve been better.

Cyprus

Cyprus

Chile

This other South American country, Chile, is now at No. 35 in our ranking of wealthiest nations. Regarded for its enormous coastline, but not really for its average earnings, which is $14,670.0 at No. 78. At No 43, its GDP of $298.2 billion is indeed significantly lower. However, its No. 34 SPI ranking gives it the shot it requires to achieve its path to the bottom half of our list. The SPI of Chile is boosted by a high rating in water and sanitation, access to medical care, and individual rights, but that is brought down by its 43.69 points in access to the best education.

Chile

Chile

Argentina

The big South American country of Argentina is No. 34 on our world’s richest countries list. With all its $12,370 average salary ringing in at No. 84 in the globe, it fails to amuse. However, its $518.5 billion GDP is currently ranked No. 24 and helps to give it a bump up. Its No. 42 ranking in the SPI is leveling all out. Access to water and sanitation in Argentina and great proper healthcare give a huge boost to its SPI score. However, its 40.82 points for access to the best education as well as 58.37 points for personal safety are dragging down its total rating.

Argentina

Argentina

Qatar

Just like UAE, Qatar is a nation rich in oil that ought to have one of the world’s highest average salaries. Unfortunately, as per The Economist, its income disparity surpasses that of the UAE, with the top earners making 13 times the poorest, which pushes its average revenue to $36,958, which currently ranked No 36. Pulling Qatar down to No. 33 is its GDP as well as SPI ratings on our richest nations list. These key categories rank No. 55 and No. 58, respectively, with such a GDP of just $192 billion as well as SPI suffering from extreme hardships with inclusiveness, individual rights, and access to advanced education.

Qatar

Qatar

Mexico

Mexico seems to have a tremendous $1.2 trillion GDP, placing it number 15 in the globe. It appears to come in at only No. 32 on our ranking of richest countries, even after this significant number. The most important downfall in Mexico arises from its No. 73 ranked average salaries of just $16,298. However, its No. 59 ranked SPI rating also does not promote it. The SPI rating reflects average scores in water and sanitation and basic healthcare, but it falls well short of 45.80 in access to the best education, 48.27 in personal safety, and 62.06 in personal choice and freedom in major aspects.

Mexico

Mexico

Hungary

Hungary, which does have a No. 36 ranked SPI due to its high ratings in water supply and sanitation, access to medical care as well as access to basic knowledge, has been the No. 31 richest country on our ranking. However, the SPI figures were not all excellent because it continues to struggle with access to the best education with such a 50.29 score as well as inclusiveness with a 58.56 score. The No. 58-ranked GDP of $155.7 billion and No. 53 ranked average salary of just $24,455 is just where Hungary lacks points.

Hungary

Hungary

Slovenia

Slovenia is number 30 on our ranking. However, its $54.2 billion GDP listed number 85 might well give rise many to leave it off any list of the richest nations. Its No. 35 ranked average wage of $37,322, and No. 22 standings on the SPI is assisting to drag it back into action. Thanks to its clean water, provision of basic knowledge, and personal rights, the latter is the rating. It sounds low with access to the best education at 52.58, but this is comparable to its European neighbors.

Slovenia

Slovenia

Greece

The same as Portugal, with its $218 billion GDP or $26,671 average salary, ranked No. 53 and No. 48 respectively, our No. 29 richest countries, Greece, will not blow any and everyone away. And for its No. 29 ranked SPI, Greece is back with clean water, adequate healthcare as well as basic knowledge. Like many Euro countries, Greece continues to struggle to access advanced education with a rating of 55.79, which negatively affects its overall score a tad.

Greece

Greece

Portugal

Portugal’s No. 50 ranked $238 billion GDP also No. 52 ranked $25,487 average revenue won’t be winning it any accolades, but still enough to put it No. 28 all in all, taken in conjunction with its No. 24 ranking in SPI. Thanks to its safe water and sanitation, access to basic healthcare, and individual rights, this high ranking is the result. Portugal is short on access to the best education, with such a 46.78 rating, but all the other evaluations are 72.89 or higher.

Portugal

Portugal

Iceland

Iceland is #27 on our ranking of richest nations. However, its $25.9 billion GDP, ranked 110th, is not really a great indicator of its riches. With near-perfect standings in water supply and sanitation as well as basic healthcare, where Iceland plays best is its No. 2 ranked SPI. It is also a global leader in the provision of basic knowledge and personal rights, although, with a rating of 61.91 for access to the best education, it falls well short. With its $66,504 annual earnings ranking No. 6 in the globe, Iceland is indeed a leader in average income. That’s enough to surmount its shortage of GDP and obtain a place at the table of the richest nations, combined with a high SPI ranking.

Iceland

Iceland

Czech Republic

The Czech Republic has been renowned for cranking out hockey players, and not so much in final products, giving rise to a GDP of $244.1 billion in its No. 48 standings. With its No. 34-ranked monthly pay of $26,962, it is not doing far better. Notwithstanding its reduced GDP as well as wage levels, thanks to its No. 26 SPI, the Czech Republic nevertheless ranks No. 26 on our list. Due to high water and sanitation ratings, basic medical care, and personal rights, the Czech Republic’s SPI is getting a boost. The Czech Republic, like many other Euro countries, is struggling with only 56.14 out of 100 points for access to the best education.

Czech Republic

Czech Republic

United Arab Emirates

The UAE checks in at No. 25 on our ranking with $414.2 billion in GDP ranked No. 30, as well as $41,010.0 in average earnings, listed No. 26. The strict policies of the UAE bring a person rights score of 54.72, as well as limited excellent education leads to access to the advanced education of 39.39, pressing it to No. 45 in the SPI ranking. The UAE has received great ratings for water supply and sanitation, access to housing, and basic healthcare, but those low evaluations can not be overcome.

United Arab Emirates

United Arab Emirates

Israel

In all three of our key measurements, Israel currently ranked in the 30’s, attempting to make it even completely take across the board and accruing it the No. 24 overall spot on the list. At $369.4 billion as well as $37,655, respectively, its GDP and average salary rated No. 34 in the globe. Its spot on the Index of Social Progress mildly keeps pushing it up.
Areas where Israel glows in the SPI also include the ideal water supply and sanitation score of 100 and top marks in basic healthcare as well as basic knowledge. It falls well short at 43.11 for inclusiveness and 59.46 points for access to advanced education.

Israel

Israel

Poland

At No. 23, Poland is close to the halfway mark of our richest countries ranking. For Poland, because it is very average in most places, there have been no actual glaring good or bad figures. Its GDP of $585.8 billion recently ranked the world’s No. 21, as well, as its SPI checks in at No. 32. High results in water supply and sanitation, healthcare, and access to basic knowledge give Poland’s SPI a surge. However, its 48.74 scores in access to the best education are relatively modest. At $29,109 annually, earnings ranks No. 43.

Poland

Poland

New Zealand

Albeit not as important as Luxembourg, a small GDP also is accomplished by New Zealand to touch down on our ranking at No. 22. This island country is No. 53 in the globe with such a $205 billion GDP, but that is pulled up by its No. 10 ranking in SPI, which it owes to a full 100 score in water supply and sanitation, as well as increased standings in basic healthcare and individual rights. Balancing all this out is its $42,325 average income of No. 25-ranked.

New Zealand

New Zealand

Luxembourg

Luxembourg, a comparatively tiny European country, checks in at No. 21 and reveals how well a nation with a couple of top marks can surmount a single weak rating. With a small population just south of 600,000, the $69.5 billion GDP of this nation is hardly a fall in the international bucket. Its pretty high $65,449 average wage, which ranks No. 7 in the globe, is pulling it from the closet in terms of overall riches. Its No. 8 standings in SPI, which also owes to a sky-high rating in water supply and sanitation, adequate healthcare, and individual rights, solidifies its spot near the middle of the scale.

Luxembourg Kirchberg At Sunset

Luxembourg

Finland

Finland is indeed the happiest country in the world, as per the World Happiness Report, and therefore it is upsetting seeing that it isn’t significantly greater than No. 20. As its standings in the WHR would imply, due to its near-perfect evaluations on water supply and sanitation and adequate healthcare, Finland recently ranked well enough in the SPI at No. 5. It is low at just 55.14 in advanced education, but no evaluations slipped below 82.28 out of 100 points. Where Finland falters is its average revenue of No. 43-ranked $275.7 billion GDP and No. 20-ranked $44,111. Money might not lead to happiness.

Finland

Finland

Singapore

Singapore’s small country is indeed an unexpected addition to our list of 50 richest nations at No. 19. The $58,770 average income of the country, which again is No. 10 in the globe, is just what helps push it so high on our ranking. Owing to its full 100 scores in water supply and sanitation as well as 98.25 in access to basic knowledge, Singapore was ranked No. 23 in SPI, two places just above the U.S. On the contrary, at 70.88 points out of 100, Singapore turns up low in personal rights.

Singapore

Singapore

Spain

In the top 50 richest countries, Spain gets to sit at No. 18, as well as owes much to its $1.4 trillion GDP, which is currently ranked No. 14 in the globe. However, it does not hurt that its high water and sanitation standings, medical care, and environmental quality are pushing its SPI worldwide to No. 19. The first and only drawback that Spain does have: its annual average income of $38,761, which is No. 31 in the globe. Even so, Spain is among the least expensive nations in Europe, and maybe you will discover more than enough average pay.

Spain

Spain

Ireland

Much more than the good fortune of the Irish, Ireland lands at No. 17 out of the 50 richest nations. It is also the 12th ranking in the SPI in Ireland, which can then be attributed to high scores in access to adequate medical care, water and sanitation, and individual rights. Compared with the rest of the globe, its 69.43 points in access to the best education is low but high in comparison to other European nations. For Ireland, GDP seems to be the only sore point, as its GDP of $375.9 billion is No. 32 in the globe.

Ireland

Ireland

Austria

At No. 16, Austria is on our ranking of the greatest 50 wealthiest countries. With its $455.7 billion GDP checking in at No. 27, as well as SPI ringing in at only No. 20, this land-locked European nation falls well short. Austria succeeds in clean water as well as sanitary conditions and also its basic healthcare in SPI, but its exposure to advanced education is weak at 46.27 points, that much similar to its European neighbors who are struggling in this segment.

Vienna Aerial Hofburg Heldenplatz Austrian National Library

Austria

Italy

With such a healthy $2.1 trillion GDP that currently ranked No. 8 in the globe, Italy is a strong No. 15 in our ranking of richest countries. The average Italian laborer’s income, which checks in at about $ 37,752, as well as its No. 21 ranking in the SPI, is holding it back. The SPI ranking of the boot-shaped nation is helped by its good ratings in water and sanitation, adequate healthcare as well as individual rights, but it is weighed down by its 66.7 points in access to the best education as well as 74.41 points in individual choice and freedom.

Italy

Italy

South Korea

South Korea, to not even be baffled with all its extroverted as well as an oppressed northern competitor, is now on our list at No. 14. Its average revenue of $39,472 is below outstanding. However, its GDP of $1.6 trillion is No. 12 in the world. No. 18 SPI of South Korea got a big boost from the country’s safe water and sanitation, adequate healthcare, as well as access to information and communication, although it is at 78.94 out of 100 points on the low end of personal freedom and choice. That’s considerably better than 3,62 out of 100 points for North Korea in the very same section.

South Korea

South Korea

Sweden

The $551 billion GDP of Sweden as well as the annual average income of $44,196 are No. 22 and No. 23 in the globe, respectively. However, the No. 11 ratings of the nation in the SPI provides it a great result in our final standings. Sweden’s SPI standings are dominated by the country’s clean water, proper healthcare, and the quality of the environment. Much like its European neighbors, access to advanced education currently ranked low at 58.99 out of 100 points.

Sweden

Sweden

Belgium

Throughout all rankings, Belgium did strike a fine line, winning out at No. 14 with an average income of $52,080 and No. 17 in the SPI, resulting in a rank of No. 12 on our ranking. Belgium succeeds in the fields of water supply and sanitation, fundamental health and medical care, and access to shelter in the SPI. However, its rating of 59.78 in access to advanced education reflects and negatively impacts several other European countries. Belgium’s GDP of $531.7 billion rings in on the top 50 list somewhere above the midway mark.

Belgium

Belgium

Denmark

No. 11-ranked Denmark, the same as Norway, also receives top ratings for its social awareness across the globe. Water and sanitation, access to shelter, as well as medical care are among the best successes on the way to a No. 4 ranking in the SPI, but because of its 56.82 out of 100 ratings, it continues to struggle to produce advanced education. Average revenue is indeed strong at $55,253, making it No. 11 in the globe, but at No. 38, its GDP of $351.2 billion is in the lower third of our leading 50.

Denmark

Denmark

Norway

Norway often is regarded as being one of the world’s most socially aware places with lower environmental damage, exceptional healthcare, and wonderful assistance programs, and it demonstrates all this with the SPI No. 1 ranking. With its 53.31 out of 100 points in access to the best education, it comes to the surface, but even that isn’t just enough to bring it down. Norway’s $434 billion No. 29-ranked GDP and $50,966 No. 15-ranked average wage dragged its total ranking to No. 10 on our list of richest countries in the world. But because of these deficiencies, it is still very high.

Norway

Norway

France

At $2.8 trillion in GDP, France is No. 6 in the globe, and that should rank higher. However, its average revenue of $44,510 is now only No. 22 in the globe, dragging its total wealth rating to No. 9. In the SPI ranking, France’s access to water as well as sanitary conditions, basic healthcare, and access to housing put it at No. 16. However, exposure to advanced education as well as inclusiveness, which also obtained scores of 64.28 out of 100 and 67.48 out of 100, respectively, have opportunities for change.

France

France

Canada

With its $1.7 trillion GDP rating of No. 10 as well as SPI checking in at No. 14, Canada is the eighth richest country. The other owes its existence to the 98.44 out of 100 inadequate healthcare, and 95.74 in individual rights score is obtained. Canada’s worst area seems to be the 69.43 points it obtained in terms of access to advanced education, which can be directly linked to its vast rural locations.

Canada

Canada

Australia

Australia has reasonably constant evaluations from across the board, with GDP at No. 13 as well as average revenue of $1.4 trillion and $53,349, respectively. It tends to come in a little low at No. 15 in SPI but still ranks highly in nourishment and basic healthcare, water and sanitation, individual rights, and access to information and communication. It really does, even so, ring in access to the best education at just 69.31 points out of 100. All of this equates to a ranking of No. 7 on our list of wealthiest countries.

Australia

Australia

United Kingdom

The UK, the No. 6 wealthiest countries on the planet, is down one total stance from the Netherlands. Whilst the $2.8 trillion GDP place it 12 spots higher than the Netherlands, its average wage drops by nine spots to just $44,770 per year. It was also lesser in SPI in six spots, with inclusiveness as well as access to advanced education seeming to be painful spots.

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

Netherlands

With such an average ranking of 12, the Netherlands is directly linked with Japan, but it ends up going about everything diversely on its way to No. 5 on our ranking. Netherlands’ $912.8 billion GDP throughout 2018 is listed only No. 17. However, its average wage of $54,262 ended up giving it an increase. The Netherlands followed Japan in SPI by a specific spot. In the very same aspects as Japan in SPI, the Netherlands succeeded, except its individual rights rating was considerably higher.

Netherlands

Netherlands

Japan

Japan is No. 3 in the globe with such a GDP of $4.9 trillion throughout 2018. However, its average wage of $40,753 decreases it to No. 4 on our ranking of richest countries. Thanks to good ratings in water supply and sanitation, provision of basic knowledge, nutrition, and basic healthcare and housing, working to help to move it back up from the low scores in average income are its No. 6 rankings in SPI. Inclusiveness, as well as access to advanced education, which may have been perplexing provided the country’s focus on innovation, has been the only sore spot in the SPI area.

Japan

Japan

United States

As of 2018, the GDP of the United States gets to sit at $20.5 trillion just at the top of the world, and there is far more to this being No. 3 on our list than just that. Average revenue is indeed greater at $63,093, placing it at world No. 9. These two high standings help it to compensate for the SPI’s remarkably low No. 25 rankings. The U.S. ranks among many of the best in the SPI in housing, water and sanitation, medical care, and personal rights, however in inclusiveness, health, and well-being, and personal safety, it falls well short.

United States

United States

Switzerland

Switzerland possesses several of the world’s largest wage levels, placing its annual average at $64,109, which plays a significant role in becoming the world’s second-richest nation. And furthermore, it features several of the most advanced social markers in the globe, such as access to drinking water, food, electricity supply, independent press, admissions in secondary schools, and greenhouse gas emissions. What differentiates it and Germany has been its $705.5 billion GDP, listed No. 20.

Switzerland

Switzerland

Germany

Completing our list as the world’s richest country isn’t all that hard to comprehend. Germany has become a top nation in GDP for a long time and ranks first in the world in some of the most important aspects of the SPI: enrollment in secondary schools, reliable electricity, access to drinking water and food.

Germany

Germany

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